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Our control horns are silver brazed for superior strength and are constructed of aircraft grade steel.

Blue Line

 

 

The standard flap horn  is constructed from tool steel and music wire. The upright arm is 1/16X1/4 tool steel brazed to music wire.   Brass bushings are installed on the music wire to help  stabilize and secure the horn to the trailing edge of the wing. If the horn is constructed with 1/8 inch wire there is a choice of either music wire or low carbon tweakable wire. The low carbon 1/8 wire gives rigidity with the benefit of being tweakable. The 1/8 music wire gives the strongest horn with the most rigidity. These flap horns can also be constructed with a 3/32 inch music wire. If using anything over a 35 to 40 muffled engine for power the 1/8 wire is recommended.   By having the 3/32 inch ID brass pushrod bushings brazed in place you will be able to solder the retaining washers on the pushrod without the chance of melting the bushings loose. If using Rocket City ball links the pushrod bushings can be replaced with 4-40 tapped holes. The wire arms can be bent to your specs or they can also be left unbent. The location  of the pushrod holes or 4-40 tapped holes are drilled to your dimensions. The upright arm of the horn can also be offset for installation into a profile airplane.  The price of this horn is $12.00 ea.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Gold Line

 

The elevator horn is constructed of the same material as the flap horn. The difference is the dimension of the upright arm being 3/16 inch instead of the 1/4 inch used on the flap horn. Wire size is either 1/8 inch or 3/32 inch music wire. The location of the pushrod hole or 4-40 taped hole and the wire span are to your dimensions. The price of this horn is $12.00 ea.

 
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Web site managed by Dan Winship.
Copyright 2002 Winship Models. All rights reserved.
Revised: August 26, 2002.